“Feed your dogs as wolves, or you’re an abuser!”

As vegans who also feed our dogs well-balanced vegan diets, we often are scathingly condemned for going against dogs’ wild nature and their desire to eat meat either cooked or raw. On the web I’ve been called an animal abuser for feeding vegan, with nasty blowhards saying my dogs should be taken away, etc. This implies that my claims of how healthy my dogs are are the lies of a delusional zealot.

Besides, no one else wanted my dogs when they were out running the streets, or when I tried to find homes for them, so taking them away from me after all these years (Mattie since 2005) would mean…what? Anyone who tried to take my beloved dogs away from me would have to be a complete fool (and may end up in the hospital). My dogs are very well cared for and happy.

I do have one dog who died last year at age 9 of lung cancer, but understand that has nothing to do with diet, but with genetics and exposure to toxins at some point in her life. My current two, Mattie and Tyler, are obviously doing very well on all vegan foods, both being full of energy, strong, playful, tireless actually, and Mattie is close to 17 years old now. She’s been vegan since 2011, and Tyler has been since I adopted him in May 2016.

“Dog Food”

Mattie does have lipomas which began growing in 2010 when I had her on meat kibble, the grain-free stuff that’s supposed to be the best. I’m not saying that caused her lipomas, but it certainly didn’t help. Since about 2012 after she’d been on vegan kibble for a couple of years, the lipomas stopped growing and have remained the same (albeit one is quite large) for going on 5 years now. Many vets do say that dietary toxins cause lipomas in dogs, so eliminating all the toxins in slaughterhouse products does seem to have helped.

The reason I don’t have Mattie’s lipomas removed is because I went through that three times with my dog Heidi back in 2004–2006, spent $1800, and each time after her traumatic experience and painful recovery, the tumor began growing back promptly and each time it got worse. The last time it recurred it got huge quickly and actually turned cancerous. I had to have her euthanized at age 14 when it was causing her discomfort in breathing, keeping her awake at night (it was behind her ribcage on her back, left side). So, cutting out lipomas is often not the answer. The answer is to get the weird toxins out of their diets. Heidi was on the grain-free premium meat foods, was rarely if ever fed vegan.

As for these very selective nature worshippers…

People cry out about the cruelty of feeding dogs vegan and how unnatural that is, while ignoring the huge pink elephant in the room: the glaring unnaturalness of dogs’ whole existence with us in human civilization. This little guy should still be with his dog family…

We are to feed them like wolves when they live nothing at all like wolves. Yet, even wolves eat plant foods and berries to satisfy certain nutritional needs. But one thing wolves do not do is split up their families when their puppies are a couple of months old, and send them off to live among strangers in some human abode, too often kept in sad and deplorable conditions, treated like trash.

Wolf families often remain together for years before some will go off to start other packs as adults, to avoid genetic problems caused by incest. Wolves plan cleverly and hunt together and travel great distances, and so forth. They don’t wear clothes or have vaccines shot into them. They don’t have bizarrely long matting coats or any of the other hindrances people have bred into them for fun and profits. What people do to dogs and their families is truly deplorable. Wholly unnatural!

If one is going to bring a litter of puppies into this world, one needs to be fully willing and capable of keeping all of the puppies for life (15-20 years) and caring for them properly. Actually, no one should be bringing puppies into this world, not deliberately and certainly not for sale. The way things are, we will always have dogs throughout the world needing homes, with not one dog breeder in existence. Dog breeders are a tremendous burden.

It would be a great thing if dogs were extremely hard to come by and truly valued and respected as individuals, not thought of as mere things you can buy and sell. That cruel mistake has led to our nightmarish puppy mills of today and our shelters being nothing more than death row prisons full of frightened dogs desperate to get out.

Anyone want to call that “natural”?

People breed dogs as commodities in cages and put them through all sorts of terrifying and grotesquely unnatural treatments to feed the continual greed of the “pet” industry. And people call that, and feeding them slaughterhouse byproducts “natural.” People become enraged that anyone would feed them all plant foods while caring carefully for them and keeping them from reproducing. Just WTF is wrong with people?

People seem to have no problem with dog breeders and the awful abuses they subject those canine families to, not to mention their adding continually to the overpopulation of dogs and their being killed by the millions yearly, everything from “shelter” executions to street injuries, to outright abuse and torture done to them by poor crazy fools due to dogs (and cats and others too) having no one to watch out for them.

Yet if you really want to see people get loudly and self-righteously outraged, just tell them your dog is vegan. While those same people’s eyes will glaze over at the actual unspeakable abuses going on out their due to the whole “pet” industry. They’ll accuse you of being “negative” and even causing people to abuse animals by speaking about it. I have seen this firsthand. Something is truly rotten, not only in Denmark (of animal “brothel” fame), but in all nations where dogs and animals are allowed to be treated as products for sale.

Treating animals as commodities or things has got to end before people will ever be justified in claiming any sort of moral “superiority.” As it all stands now, we’re nothing but monsters, despite the good among us which cannot ever compensate for the horrors incalculable numbers of animals live and die through under our “care” every minute of every day.

So no, I will not support the slaughter industry by buying meat or animal products for my animals. Now, put a sock in it, those of you who rail against feeding dogs vegan. You seriously need to direct your outrage elsewhere.

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Humanity’s Self-Taught, Eagerly Learned, Yet Forever Denied Sociopathy

[UPDATED August 1, 2017, two links added]

By Kevin Dooley on Flickr – “Corporate Bully”

I’m currently reading “Guilty by Reason of Insanity” by Dorothy Otnow Lewis, MD, and it’s an exercise in fascination as well as irritation. She’s an engaging writer and the knowledge one can gain from her cases is intense, as long as you can overlook her personal boasting and liberal bias. Her accounts are inconsistent. She once again proved to me that even a highly trained psychiatrist is subject to a form of mental illness, and denial of such. Yet I still love reading this book…it is that well written and the cases are that interesting, if highly disturbing, and often left unfinished by her.

For just one example…

She’s proud to be the last woman who kissed Ted Bundy, and survived, as one who did extensive interviews with him on Death Row. Maddeningly, she does not delve into her discussions with Bundy except for brief excerpts that reveal nothing about him except for his great rapport with her, of which she seems proud. Bundy of course was the world famous sadistic rapist and serial killer who years ago was executed for his crimes. He of course tortured animals in his past.

Further, Lewis, who occasionally and briefly mentions the abuse of animals as a disturbing foreteller of violence and murder of humans, fails to make the connection in her own life and habits such as her enjoyment of hearty meat/egg/dairy filled breakfasts and such. She describes a knife used in a heinous murder as one normally used to cut meat, as if human flesh is not also meat.

Also, she apparently approves of animal vivisection. She writes of an example of brain injuries causing extreme violence, citing sadistic experiments on “decorticate” cats where the cat’s cortex is separated surgically from the rest of the brain. That is extreme madness in itself, subhumanly sadistic behavior. The fact that Lewis blithely cites it tells me the woman is unhinged in her own special way. No excuse justifies such things. Human brain research exists proving the effects of brain damage in humans.

But one chapter of Lewis’s book especially got to me…

And that’s the main subject of this piece. It’s the story of Roger, a Death Row inmate there for the brutal murder of a woman, her small child and their sheepdog. Roger could not remember anything about the murders nor about his and his three brothers’ childhood full of torture and rape. Their tortures occurred on an animal farm in Seattle, Washington, the home of “Mother Carry,” a crazed religious zealot, and her 20-year-old son, Hyram. Annoyingly, again, Lewis doesn’t state a timeframe for this case, but I deduced that the farm episode was likely in the 1960s…

Roger and his three brothers had been placed in foster “care” on that farm due to abuse and neglect in their own home. The four brothers were so traumatized by their time on that farm that they all pretty much blocked it out and drank and/or drugged themselves into oblivion regularly if the memories threatened to invade their minds once again. Following is an excerpt from Lewis’s book that details the tortures those four boys endured as well as what those animals endured, on pages 134–135, but Roger’s story starts on page 131:

https://books.google.com/books?id=_JSPxFzNpQEC&pg=PA134&dq=mother+carry+and+son+hyram#v=snippet&q=134

By Stacie on Flickr – “baby lambs”

So, after reading that, among all the other past and current accounts of horrendous tortures occurring in animal “farms,” does anyone still think animal farming and slaughter do not attract, nurture the sickness in, fuel and propagate, as well as create, violent criminals and sadistic psychopaths? If you’re still of that mindset, then you’re horribly mistaken, to put it mildly. Violent human-on-human crime rates including torture, rape and murder are far higher among animal farm and slaughter workers (and other animal abuse industries) than among any other group or among the general population.

Interesting article here: https://www.thestar.com/news/insight/2010/05/14/probing_the_link_between_slaughterhouses_and_violent_crime.html. Please realize, it’s not only the workers who are mentally/emotionally damaged by these violent, ruthless practices…all of us human beings, collectively and individually, are badly affected as well.

“Oh, but I know a guy who works in slaughter and he’s nice”

No, the fact that “most” slaughter workers aren’t violent or murderous against humans proves nothing. A few are decent people doing an ugly job out of desperation (while they could be making plant foods instead, if we were all vegan). One of their stories is here: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/anna-pippus/meet-the-former-slaughter_b_10199262.html. The rest, so well trained in brutality and killing, restrain themselves from violent/sadistic acts upon people, for self-preservation, and others simply avoid culpability by not getting caught. The rest are the ones we hear about in the news.

What are slaughter workers to think when people’s abuse of animals is known as fact to be a disturbing, cowardly, creepy crime committed by those without a conscience, and yet society at large happily (yet quietly and in denial) approves of their daily torture and bloody slaughter of innocent, docile animals? Can people even register the level of sickness and evil that’s been allowed to fester among our species? And for these frivolous desires (like burgers) that have nothing to do with real need and are even damaging to our physical health, aside from the mental.

So if you’re not vegan…

Please rethink what you’re eating and supporting…get honest…then be vegan, for sane ethics and for life. And be smart about it, don’t allow yourself to become an example of “failure” because you only eat pasta and lettuce, or sugary junk foods, or whatever. Study nutrition a bit, using objective sources, not industry propaganda, and eat right and get enough exercise. It’s not so hard.

Anyhow, I’m just sick after reading about “Mother Carry” and her deranged Hyram and that dismal “farm” of theirs. Baby animals tortured mercilessly, that was all vile enough, then there were the boys. There was no followup about them in Lewis’s book (another irritation) and I can find nothing about those two on the web. Apparently they went off scot-free and likely tortured thousands more animals and many kids over the years, as a “foster home” regularly used by the state. Hopefully they died long ago and are in Hell where they belong, despite the mother’s “devotion to Jesus.”

These people lacking conscience have got to stop being used for food production or anything else. They belong in intensive mental health care for life and could be phased out if our species ended its collective dementia, exorcised it at its roots. Then the child abuse, torture, rape behind all violent crime could stop being fed by society’s tacit approval in the form of the psychopathy required for us all to be fed by sadistic people who prey upon the helpless.

First, the denials and glaring hypocrisy have got to be brought into full light, and ended.

27 Vegan Super Foods to Rely On and Why

In alphabetical order, here are the superfoods…go get ‘em and get healthier!

Almonds (and other nuts)

Almonds are the most calcium-rich nut out there. And, from Medical News Today: “Almonds are a source of vitamin E, copper, magnesium, and high-quality protein; they also contain high levels of healthy unsaturated fatty acids along with high levels of bioactive molecules (such as fiber, phytosterols, vitamins, other minerals, and antioxidants) which can help prevent cardiovascular heart diseases.”

Amaranth (called a grain but is a seed)

From Dr. Axe: “Amaranth is a great source of protein, fiber, manganese, magnesium, phosphorus and iron. It will keep your digestive system regulated, build your strength, and reduce the risk of fracture or broken bones.”

It’s an anti-inflammatory food, gluten free, prevents diabetes, and lowers cholesterol. How to use amaranth: http://www.thekitchn.com/how-to-cook-amaranth-64211

Asparagus

From Eating Well: “Asparagus is a very good source of fiber, folate, vitamins A, C, E and K, as well as chromium, a trace mineral that enhances the ability of insulin to transport glucose from the bloodstream into cells.”

It’s also a brain booster, helps fight cancer, powerful antioxidant, and natural diuretic. Steamed, roasted, sautéed, or added to stir-fries, asparagus is tasty and great for us.

Avocados

A tree fruit loaded with vitamins, minerals and beneficial plant compounds, notably potassium, vitamin E, vitamin K, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B6, folate, pantothenic acid, and copper. Avocados are rich in good fats, namely monounsaturated fat, and contain a bit of polyunsaturated fat. They even contain a good amount of fiber (11% of daily need in just 1/3 of a medium Haas avocado). All in all, avocados are a great nutrition source.

Beans (especially black, but also chickpeas, pintos and all the rest)

Black beans are tasty, fat free, fiber rich, and rich in protein, vitamins and minerals, notably: iron, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, zinc, copper, manganese, with impressive amounts of vitamins thiamin and folate. They’re affordable, filling, disease-fighting due to being antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, heart healthy, good for diabetics, cancer preventive. Of all the beans, black are best, but the rest are great for us too.

Blueberries (and others like cherries, raspberries, strawberries)

From Dr. Axe: “Natural medicine has long held that these round purple berries give long-life health benefits… Native to North America, blueberries are rich in proanthocyanidin, contributing to blueberry benefits that include fighting cancer, losing weight and glowing, young skin. Blueberries are also rich in vitamin C, vitamin K, manganese and other antioxidants that lead to its numerous other health benefits…

…The ORAC score of blueberries is an incredible 9,621, which makes it one of the highest antioxidant foods in the world.”

Bok Choy

This low-calorie, high-fiber cruciferous vegetable has a full spectrum of over 70 antioxidants which is a major cancer preventive benefit, in addition to its cancer fighting glucosinolates and sulfur-containing compounds. Bok choy also has impressive amounts of vitamin A (as beta-carotene) and lutein, as well as vitamins/minerals: K, C, potassium, folate, calcium, B6, manganese, and iron. Bok choy is simply awesome. Recipe: http://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/stir-fried-bok-choy-and-mizuna-with-tofu

Broccoli

One of the world’s most nutritious vegetables, broccoli contains vitamins A, C, K, B (including folate), and minerals calcium, iron and potassium. It’s high in fiber, low in calories, non-fat, and even has protein (8% of needed in just 50 calories worth or just above 5 oz., and that’s not much broccoli). Broccoli is affordable, can be kept frozen and used as needed in stir-fries, steamed, roasted, or eaten raw. It’s tasty enough too, easy to learn to enjoy. It’s a fantastic food, basically.

Brussels Sprouts

These little green balls contain impressive amounts of fiber, vitamins K and C, a bit of vitamin A, folate, manganese, B vitamins and protein, and even 270 mg of omega-3 fatty acids in just one cup cooked (recommend daily dose is 250 to 500 milligrams of EPA & DHA for healthy adults). Brussels can decrease your risk of obesity, cancer, diabetes, heart disease and neurodegenerative disorders; can improve energy, muscle growth, eyesight and complexion. Great recipe including two other foods in this article: https://www.thespruce.com/roasted-mixed-vegetables-with-maple-glaze-3377354

Carrots

They’re of course good for the eyes with their high beta-carotene (vitamin A) content. One medium raw carrot has 5% of your daily potassium need, 6% of fiber, 6% of vitamin C, and 5% of your magnesium. Cooking till just tender can make more of carrots’ nutrition absorbable, but raw (well-shredded or -chewed) they’re still nutritious. Carrot juice is surprisingly tasty, with large amounts of beta-carotene which converts to retinol (vitamin A) in needed/safe amounts…as opposed to “real” vitamin A in animal products and supplements which can be toxic when over-consumed.

Cocoa (dark chocolate)

Cocoa powder is low in calories and has almost no sugar, but is a bit high in saturated fat which is said to be a good fat that doesn’t harm cholesterol levels. Natural cocoa (as opposed to Dutch processed with alkali) is a good source of protein, riboflavin and zinc, and a very good source of dietary fiber, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, copper and manganese. According to Livestrong, it’s said that cocoa may lower LDL cholesterol, reduce the risk of blood clots, increase blood flow to the arteries, and lower high blood pressure.

Flaxseed Meal

Flaxseed meal gives us fiber, omega-3 fat, protein, vitamins B1 & B6, manganese, magnesium, phosphorus, selenium, iron, potassium, copper, and zinc. It increases nutrient absorption by its mucilage gum content, and reduces sugar cravings, improves skin & hair health, etc. It promotes digestive health by protecting the lining of the GI tract, while also relieving constipation. High in antioxidants (lignans), flaxseeds help reduce risk of cancer as well as being immunity boosting, anti-aging, hormone balancing, and beneficial to cellular health.

Garlic

Garlic improves the flavor of most every savory dish, and is very healthy due to its high Allicin content. Garlic is low-calorie with impressive amounts of manganese, B6, vitamins B6 & C, selenium, fiber, and a bit of a few other essential nutrients. Based in human studies, garlic is immunity boosting, able to prevent or help treat colds & flu, improves cholesterol levels; its antioxidant effect can prevent Alzheimer’s, etc., and garlic can reduce heavy metal toxicity in the body. Onions, leeks, chives, shallots, and scallions are also members of the garlic (Allium) family with some of the same, if lesser, nutrient values.

Green Peas

A cup of peas has less than 100 calories but lots of protein, fiber and micro-nutrients. Surprisingly, green peas are very nutritious, with a good amount of calcium, iron, copper, zinc, and manganese, 45% of the daily need of vitamin K for blood coagulation, and nearly 25% of daily need of thiamin, vitamin A, and folate. Peas’ high polyphenol content, a phytonutrient called coumestrol, is shown to prevent stomach cancer in human studies. Peas are also high in antioxidants, anti-inflammatory, blood sugar regulating, heart healthy, good for our bones, and even environmentally beneficial.

Hemp Seeds

These most nutritious seeds in the world are allergen-free and provide complete protein, essential fats omega 3 & 6, and virtually no sugar. They help prevent obesity and improve our energy, disease/injury recovery and heart health. They’re anti-inflammatory and help with circulation, immunity, and blood sugar. Hemp seeds provide: gamma linolenic acid (GLA), antioxidants, all the amino acids, fiber, iron, zinc, carotene, phospholipids, phytosterols, vitamin B1, vitamin B2, vitamin B6, vitamin D, vitamin E, chlorophyll, calcium, magnesium, sulfur, copper, potassium, phosphorus, and enzymes.

Kale (and other dark leafy greens like collards, spinach, turnip greens)

Mind Body Green states the top 10 benefits of eating kale: 1) Low-calorie, high-fiber, zero fat, 2) High iron, 3) High in vitamin K, 4) Filled with powerful antioxidants, 5) A great anti-inflammatory food, 6) Great for cardiovascular support, 7) High in vitamin A, 8) High in vitamin C, 9) High in calcium, and 10) A great detoxifying food (due to its fiber and sulfur content and keeping your liver healthy).

Just 2 cups chopped finely provide us with large amounts of essential vitamins A & K, not to mention all the rest of its nutrients, so kale is a vital addition to our diets.

Lentils

Mind Body Green states the top 7 benefits of lentils: 1) Lower cholesterol (due to their artery cleansing soluble fiber), 2) Heart health (due to their high folate & magnesium), 3) Digestive health (due to their insoluble fiber), 4) Stabilized blood sugar (due to the soluble fiber), 5) Good protein (26% of their calories are protein), 6) Increases energy (from their fiber, complex carbs and iron), and 7) Weight loss (due to their high nutrition while being low-calorie; 1 cup cooked contains 230 calories and virtually no fat).

Millet (and other whole grains like oats, rye, barley, wheat)

Millet has a uniquely high nutrient content, including B vitamins, calcium, iron, potassium, zinc, magnesium, and is a healthy source of essential fats. High in fiber & protein, millet helps your heart and cholesterol levels, protects against diabetes, aids digestion, lowers risk of cancer, has antioxidant effects, and can help with asthma. A caution: The excessive work needed to properly digest and process millet may be damaging to those with poor glandular and/or thyroid health, so millet should be used in modest or moderate amounts. Oats, rye, barley (and wheat for those not sensitive to it) can be used instead.

Mushrooms

When cooked, they’re said to prevent cancer; but their cells walls are undigestible when raw and also thought to slightly increase cancer risk. Mushrooms are heart healthy, immune boosting, and provide many of the nutritional benefits of high-protein foods. They’re low-calorie, fat-free, cholesterol- & gluten-free, low-sodium, and provide vital nutrients like selenium, potassium, riboflavin, and niacin. Mushrooms go great with tofu, greens and sweet potatoes. Here’s a tasty recipe for those who like things complicated (haha not me): https://www.tastyseasons.com/baked-tofu-coconutty-kale-sweet-potatoes-mushrooms/

Potatoes

Russet, white or red, those tasty potatoes all offer good nutrition, are an excellent source of vitamins C & B6, potassium, fiber, and iron. They’re fat-, sodium-, cholesterol-, and gluten-free, and low in calories (roughly 30 c’s per ounce). Said to be high on the Glycemic Index (bad for blood sugar), but that is in dispute; still, potatoes should perhaps be used sparingly for diabetics or those with blood sugar issues. It’s said that excess calories overall (especially animal protein & fat) contribute to type 2 diabetes, more than carbs do. Potatoes are more nutritious with skin on, but peeled are still nutritious.

Pumpkin

Plain cooked pumpkin flesh is high-fiber, nutrient-rich, low-calorie; it has a bit of protein, almost zero fat, and is low-carb, but with a high Glycemic Index… yet its being low-carb offsets its blood sugar effect, so its GI rating of 75 isn’t quite right. (Under 55 GI is considered low, 55 and up is high.) Pumpkin is very high in antioxidant beta-carotene which converts to vitamin A. It may help prevent cancer, heart disease and premature aging. One cup of puree provides about 3,200 IU of converted vitamin A which fills the daily need in adults, and also vitamins K, C & E and minerals: iron, magnesium, potassium, manganese, etc..

Quinoa

Quinoa dates back 3000-4000 years. The “supergrain” is actually a seed with high amounts of these vital nutrients: Protein (all 9 essential amino acids), Fiber (lowers cholesterol, etc., is heart healthy and relieves constipation), Iron (supplies oxygen to our muscles & brain), Lysine (for tissue growth & repair), Magnesium (for blood vessel health, migraine relief, control of blood sugar & prevention/treatment of diabetes, healthy bones & teeth, etc.), Riboflavin/B2 (improves energy metabolism in brain & muscle cells), and antioxidant Manganese (prevents damage by protecting cells from free radicals).

Soy Beans (organic tofu, etc.)

The ORGANIC, non-GMO, high-protein soybean and its whole or minimally processed products like tofu contain 8 of the 9 essential amino acids (complete protein). Soy is a great source of fiber, B vitamins, calcium, and omega-3 fat. It can reduce menopause problems in women; its isoflavones (phytoestrogens) have been found to have antioxidant properties. As far as any hormonal problems from soy, that’s very likely a misleading fear tactic used by those protecting their own interests. Here’s a recent, concluded human study on women with breast cancer: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/cncr.30615/abstract

Sunflower Seeds (and others including sesame, pumpkin, etc.)

These little beige things can be quite tasty (when lightly roasted/salted) but are healthiest raw. They promote cardiovascular health due to their vitamin E and folate, their phytosterols support healthy cholesterol levels, their magnesium promotes respiratory, heart and reproductive health. Magnesium also improves our moods, relieves depression, etc. The selenium in sunflower and other seeds is a powerful antioxidant and good for thyroid health. So what’s not to love about that beautiful flower and it’s thousands of health-promoting seeds?

Sweet Potatoes

Sweet potatoes are an excellent source of vitamin A (as beta-carotene), and a good source of vitamins C & B6, manganese, copper, pantothenic acid, as well as potassium, fiber, niacin, vitamin B1, vitamin B2 and phosphorus. The original “healthiest diet in the world” of past Okinawans of Japan was sweet-potato based, since these delicious orange spuds are excellent for us. Due to its high fiber, a BAKED sweet potato’s high 94 GI rating isn’t quite what it appears, and BOILED, sweet potato has a low 46 GI. Eat one large sweet potato and you’ve satisfied your daily adult need for converted vitamin A.

Tomatoes

Tomatoes, which are fruit, are a large part of the world’s diet. They’re impressive for their content of: Vitamin C, biotin, molybdenum, vitamin K, potassium, copper, manganese, fiber, vitamins A, B6, B3, folate, and lesser amounts of several others. They’re low-calorie, have a very low GI rating, and are powerful antioxidants and anti-inflammatory, which protects our bones, liver, kidneys, and bloodstream, and reduces our risk for cancers, especially prostate cancer. Tomatoes’ heart health benefits are amazing due to their antioxidant properties and regulation of fats in the bloodstream.

And last but not least – Watermelon (and others like cantaloupe)

Live Science: “Watermelons are mostly water — about 92 percent — but this refreshing fruit is soaked with nutrients. Each juicy bite has significant levels of vitamins A, B6 and C, lots of lycopene, antioxidants and amino acids. There’s even a modest amount of potassium.”

Vitamin B6 helps to break down/metabolize protein. Watermelon has beneficial relaxant effects on blood vessels due to its phytonutrients: lycopene, beta-carotene, and citrulline which converts to arginine, an amino acid that strengthens the heart & circulation system and thereby helps treat heart ailments.