Why we should eat non-GMO 100% organic corn and soy

 [See UPDATE at bottom]

Corn and Soy…

…are the most genetically modified crops out there, due to their being used in vast quantities by animal farmers and their wanting the stuff cheap and easy to grow, regardless of the health consequences. So those two crops, when not grown organically, are heavily modified.

Tofu, Eggplant & Rice Dish

Monsanto’s glyphosate is the chemical at issue here…it’s also known as Roundup®, which is the most used herbicide in the USA and is being used increasingly around the world. “Roundup-ready” genetically engineered crops are grown from seeds engineered to contain a gene from “Agrobacteria.” That genetic modification makes the food crops resistant to glyphosate, meaning that only unwanted foliage cannot survive, serving to keep the food crops pure and most profitable. Users of Roundup-ready seeds are required to treat their crops with Roundup®. Corn and soy are the primary Roundup-ready crops, since, again, they’re the mainstays in the diets of “food animals.”

Of course, the manufacturer of glyphosate says it is beneficial and relatively harmless, so if you’d like to see that side, simply Google “Monsanto’s statement about glyphosate.”

Canola oil is another item which is heavily modified using Roundup® on the rapeseed crops, so it’s also wise to avoid anything but 100% organic non-GMO canola oil, if you use that oil at all.

What’s wrong with glyphosate?

[See UPDATE at bottom]

Glyphosate is a broad-spectrum systemic herbicide which is said by some scientists to disrupt the way the body manages sulfur. Autism, for example, is associated with poor sulfur metabolism. Glyphosate also supposedly causes aluminum to be more toxic in the body, which is a great health concern due to the aluminum in vaccines.

Pathogens

Glyphosate is said by some to kill beneficial bacteria in the gut which allows pathogens (disease-causing bacteria) like C. difficile to overgrow which leads to “leaky gut syndrome” and indirectly promotes aluminum uptake by cells. All this can lead to kidney failure which leads to aluminum retention in tissues (including the brain) which can lead to dementia, a.k.a. Alzheimer’s disease.

Some scientists also claim that glyphosate disrupts the “shikimate pathway” in our guts and depletes our tryptophan, which is the precursor to melatonin. Melatonin transports sulfate into the brain and reduces heavy metal toxicity in the body. Good stores of melatonin are said to bind to toxic metals like aluminum, lead, etc., and reduce their toxic effects in the body. But unfortunately, those scientists (Samsel and Seneff) get much of their data from animal studies. But if the above is true for humans, our being low in melatonin can bring on a lot of damage.

Vegan foods (preferably organic) high in Tryptophan are: Nuts, Seeds, Tofu & Soy, Oats, Beans, Lentils

Foods (preferably organic) high in Melatonin are: Pineapples, Bananas, Oranges, Oats, Sweet Corn, Rice, Tomatoes, Barley 

So, especially for anything containing corn, soy products or canola oil, just be sure it’s labeled 100% organic and non-GMO and you should avoid any problems related to glyphosate. If corn, soy or canola oil are listed in ingredients without the terms “organic” and “non-GMO,” simply avoid that product to help protect your health.

It makes one wonder how the animals and the animal products most people consume are affected by this herbicide. Surely some of the common illnesses farm animals suffer are due to glyphosate in all that corn and soy, among many other unhealthy practices. It’s likely that the meat, milk and eggs that come from these intensive farms has harmful effects, in concentrated form, for people who consume them. Sorry for the following image, but this is the reality…

UPDATE: Current related article concerning suspicions of people developing non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (a form of cancer) as a result of exposure to glyphosate, despite the findings from animal studies which concluded that the herbicide would not cause cancer in humans: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/14/business/monsanto-roundup-safety-lawsuit.html Another case where animal testing is shown to be unscientific and dangerous, aside from the sadistic cruelty perpetrated by “human” beings against the innocent and helpless.

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Great for Your Heart – Seventeen Easy-to-Get Plant Foods

First, have a look at this extremely vital organ (click to enlarge)
1000px-human_healthy_pumping_heart_en-svgBasic CMYK

So yeah, the heart is the strongest and hardest working muscle in the body. It’s amazingly complex, so it and your entire cardiovascular (heart and blood vessels) and vitally connected pulmonary (lung) systems need good care…

Below is a nice selection of beneficial foods for heart health. But they’re good for us in other ways as well, such as cancer prevention, brain health, and so on. To keep it concise, I’ll only concentrate on heart health here and won’t go on about sources or every single reason why, all of which can be found by searching the individual foods online at nutrition or medical sites. And of course there are other heart-healthy foods too, but those listed here are some of the best, and ones I especially like.

As far as serving sizes, it’s up to you of course, but what seems best are bigger servings for the lower calorie/fat foods and smaller amounts for the high fat/calorie foods, according to individual tastes and needs. Just keep your body mass index (BMI) at 25 or lower and don’t overeat regularly or have huge binges, and you can prevent abuse of your system. Such self-abuse of course leads to diseases including diabetes, and that is miserable.

I have most of these foods fairly regularly, so my heart should be pretty healthy. It seems to be. But stress takes a toll, so I need to be cutting down on that. Exercise is of course important too and I get in some of that every day. And thank goodness for those hyperactive little doggies who make me get out for walks & hikes regularly. If I skip a day they hound me without mercy. 😩

So, here is solely the food “prescription” for a healthy heart, in my estimation going by studying nutrition research online. Images are public domain. In alphabetical order:

Asparagus ~

asparagusIt has high amounts of the amino acid asparagine which is a natural diuretic, increasing urination and ridding the body of excess salt. That’s especially good for people with edema, high blood pressure or other heart conditions. Asparagus is also loaded with antioxidants which neutralize cell-damaging free radicals in the body.

Avocados ~ 

avocado-878958_960_720They contain healthy monounsaturated fats which may lower heart disease risk factors. They’re also high in antioxidants and in potassium. They go great with big green salads along with tomatoes.

Bananas ~

banana-1025109_960_720Not only a tasty satisfying treat to replace candy and such, bananas are high in potassium which helps to lower blood pressure, giving you a 27% lower risk of heart disease than people with low potassium diets. And bananas are a good source of magnesium which is also important for heart health.   

Berries, notably Blueberries ~

berries-1225101_960_720Eating more than three servings of blueberries and strawberries a week significantly lowers risk of heart attack, said benefit due to compounds known as anthocyanins, flavonoids (which are antioxidants) that may decrease blood pressure and dilate blood vessels. Anthocyanins give plants their red and blue colors.

Chia & Flax Seeds ~

chia-397076_960_720They’re high in omega-3 fatty acids and fiber and thereby good for your heart (as well as digestion & elimination). Flaxseed meal is better digested because the hard seeds mostly pass through undigested. The ground meal should be kept frozen until used, and a couple of tablespoons a day on cereal or in smoothies is a good way to have them.

Chocolate (Dark, 70%+) ~

chocolate-968457_960_720Studies show that dark chocolate may benefit your heart by reducing nonfatal heart attacks and stroke in high-risk people. This applies to only dark (not milk) chocolate; dark chocolate contains flavonoids (polyphenols) which may help blood pressure, clotting and inflammation.

Coffee (black without sugar) ~

coffeeA 2012 NEJM study found a 10 to 15% lower risk of dying from heart disease or other causes in men and women who drank six or more cups of coffee a day, but other research has shown that even two cups can lower risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke by 30%. But coffee isn’t necessarily good in large amounts due to the stimulating and heartbeat increase effects, so it’s not for everyone.

Greens – Broccoli, Spinach and Kale, etc. ~

green-vegetables-1149790_960_720Green leafy vegetables are especially good for your heart due to their being high in carotenoids which act as antioxidants to rid your body of harmful compounds. They’re also high in fiber and contain loads of vitamins and minerals, notably vitamins K and A (beta-carotene). Kale also has some omega-3 fatty acids.

Legumes ~

legumes-black-bean-dishBeans, lentils, and peas are an excellent source of protein. One study found that people who ate legumes at least four times a week had a 22% lower risk of heart disease than those who consumed them less than once a week. And legumes may help control blood sugar in people with diabetes, which is vital for avoiding diabetes complications, including heart disease.

Nuts (almonds, walnuts, pistachios, peanuts and macadamias) ~

mixed_nuts_small_white1All of which contain healthy fiber, and vitamin E which helps lower bad cholesterol. And walnuts are especially high in omega-3 fatty acids. Nuts are high in calories & fat but eating a modest amount daily doesn’t seem to contribute to obesity.

Oatmeal & other Whole Grains ~

oatmealThey’re high in soluble fiber, which can lower cholesterol, acting as a sponge in the digestive tract to soak up cholesterol so it isn’t absorbed into the bloodstream. And all the whole grains provide us with needed vitamins & minerals. This means sprouted breads and other whole grain products like cereals, barley, kamut, etc..

Olive Oil (Extra-Virgin) ~

olive-oil-968657_960_720A 2013 NEJM study showed that people at high risk for heart disease who ate diets high in grains, fruits, vegetables, along with nuts and olive oil reduced their risk of heart attacks, strokes and dying by 30%. Olive oil is a good source of monounsaturated fats, which can help reduce both cholesterol and blood sugar levels. Olives themselves are another source of good fat.

Orange, Red & Yellow Vegetables ~

orange-veggies-sweet-potatoSuch as carrots, sweet potatoes, red peppers and butternut squash are loaded with carotenoids, fiber and vitamins (notably vitamin A as beta-carotene), all of which are great for heart health. I like to get several sweet potatoes, bake them all and have them on hand all week for a great healthy addition to meals. Note: Peppers and gourds (squash) are technically fruits but commonly used as vegetables.

Orange-Fleshed Fruits (especially citrus but including mangoes, cantaloupe, etc.) ~

orangesMeaning fresh whole fruits and juices (no added sugar). The flavonoids in oranges and grapefruits lower risk of ischemic (clot) stroke by 19%. The high vitamin C in citrus is linked with a lower risk of heart disease, as is the fiber. And mangoes, cantaloupe, pumpkin, etc., have the additional benefits of beta-carotene (vitamin A).

Potatoes (russet) ~

potatoes-1388512_960_720They’re rich in potassium which can lower blood pressure, and fiber which can lower risk for heart disease. Provided you keep them low-fat, like with a drizzle of seasoned oil (not deep fried). Besides that, when prepared right they’re delicious and filling.

Soy/Tofu (organic non-gmo) ~

soy-orange-marinated-tofuRich in protein, low fat (polyunsaturated), no cholesterol; soy has been shown to help reduce blood pressure. Tofu contains all eight essential amino acids, and is also a good source of iron, calcium, manganese, selenium, phosphorous, magnesium, copper, zinc, and vitamin B1.

Tomatoes (fresh whole, raw or cooked) ~

tomatoesHigh in heart-healthy potassium and a good source of lycopene which helps get rid of bad cholesterol, keeps blood vessels open and lowers heart attack risk. And they’re low in calories and sugar.

 

Of Pride and Shame Regarding Our Food, Etc.

This is basically a grateful tribute to hardworking crop farmers and the Earth for providing us all such a huge array of healthy foods. But then I got to thinking again, so had to add some preaching, so please bear with me…

Yes, vegan is far better. There, I said it…shame on me for judging. Shame!

People are way too sensitive about their food habits, way too much emotion attached to meals and what they enjoy eating. To judge or “attack” meat eater’s food choices is akin to hurling vicious insults about their mothers. Why is that? Especially when vegans’ food choices and sensitivities regarding animal abuse and killing are trashed, hated, ridiculed, essentially beaten into submission or silenced by those same sensitive meat lovers.

It’s all rather revealing, isn’t it.

Shame on all those who vehemently defend animal slaughter and condemn vegans as “self-righteous bullies & creeps” for simply speaking up and telling the truth. Yes, shame on you. I’m not talking about those who still eat/use animal products, but specifically about those vehemently fighting against veganism and promoting animal foods. They can be seen “debunking” everything and making snide remarks on just about anything pro-vegan online.

As for their reasons: This “threat” to the industries is real. After all, more people are convinced every day to stop using the products of animal exploitation and killing. But anyone, including animal farmers, can change and be far better than they are presently, in this one area. And yes, it is an extremely important thing…our treatment of animals…no matter how strenuously people assert that it is not.

The photos below are just to show in a simplistic way how crop farming is vastly superior to animal farming, in every way, and how animal farmers can and should change over to crop farming. To animal farmers I say: Leave behind all that gore and noise and guilt, and go clean, by growing plant foods. 

[NOTE: All images are public domain, free to re-use, some requiring credit. Animal photos at bottom are not terribly graphic. Click on photos to enlarge.]

Here we have something to be proud of and grateful for:

Our overabundance of healthy foods from the earth, much of which goes to waste due to people’s reliance on products of abuse and slaughter and the standard accompaniments: processed junk foods. Have a look at several produce farms and farmers markets from around the world…

Iowa City Farmers Market by Alan Light on flickr

Iowa City Farmers Market by Alan Light on flickr

Family Vegetable Garden in Brazil

Family Vegetable Garden in Brazil

Market in Lhasa, Tibet

Market in Lhasa, Tibet

Market in Farmington, Michigan

Market in Farmington, Michigan

Corn Field

Corn Field

St. Jacob's Farmers Market, Ontario, Canada

St. Jacob’s Farmers Market, Ontario, Canada

Fruit at Twilight in Layyah, Pakistan

Fruit at Twilight in Layyah, Pakistan

Ontario Grain Farm, Canada

Ontario Grain Farm, Canada

By Natalie Maynor, flickr

By Natalie Maynor, flickr

Ballard Farmers Market in Seattle, Washington

Ballard Farmers Market in Seattle, Washington

Lemon Orchard in Galilee by David Shankbone

Lemon Orchard in Galilee by David Shankbone

Market in Dallas, Texas

Market in Dallas, Texas

Westside Market in Cleveland, Ohio

Westside Market in Cleveland, Ohio

Weed Orchards Pumpkin Patch

Weed Orchards Pumpkin Patch

Mountain View, California, Farmers Market

Mountain View, California, Farmers Market

La Boqueria Market, Catalonia, Spain

La Boqueria Market, Catalonia, Spain

Lettuce - Mustard Seed Farms in Oregon

Lettuce – Mustard Seed Farms in Oregon

San Juan de Dios Market, Guadalajara, Mexico

San Juan de Dios Market, Guadalajara, Mexico

Flint Michigan Market

Flint Michigan Market

Home Vegetable Garden

Home Vegetable Garden

Jamalpur Ahmedabad Market

Jamalpur Ahmedabad Market

Market in Meppadi, India

Market in Meppadi, India

Chicago Urban Farm

Chicago Urban Farm

All that versus the shame:

The torture of highly sentient lives, human health damages, toxic pollution, and waste of resources…not food for ethical human beings…

Hog Confinement Barn

Hog Confinement Barn

Hog Farm Waste Lagoon in Georgia

Hog Farm Waste Lagoon in Georgia

Vintage Photo - Pig Slaughter

Vintage Photo – Pig Slaughter

Proud or ashamed – which do you choose?