My Brother “Tommy” Has Passed On

My younger brother, Tom, had suffered with type 2 diabetes for a long time. He’d kept it a secret from everyone until late 2015 when he could no longer ignore and neglect it. Well, just this November 19, Sunday at 11:00 pm, diabetes finally took his life.

Courtesy of the CDC

Cardiac arrest explained

His death came as a result of cardiac arrest, a.k.a. sudden cardiac death. One of the problems he developed due to the diabetes was heart failure with tachycardia (rapid heartbeat). Tachycardia is a great risk factor for cardiac arrest, where the heart’s electrical system goes bad, the heart starts quivering instead of beating, the brain is quickly devoid of blood, and the person feels faint, blacks out, falls down and stops breathing. Essentially dead. Unless someone can work a miracle by doing chest compressions and CPR. But the real remedy is to quickly apply defibrillators to the person’s chest to electrically stun the heart back into beating and pumping blood. Only about 10% of people who have cardiac arrest survive without defibrillation within about four minutes from blacking out. About 30% of them survive after defibrillation is done promptly. So cardiac arrest is seriously deadly unless one is very lucky.

When saving someone’s life is not merciful

In Tom’s case, bringing him back to that terribly sick and suffering body would have been a dreadful disservice to him. But the paramedics tried and tried for about half an hour. They got no response. Cardiac arrest was a merciful death for someone so sick for so long. He started getting medical treatment very late in the disease, got the usual tests and prescriptions and their side effects, and some natural and herbal remedies he was trying, but he just couldn’t seem to get a handle on the situation and his body kept on getting worse. He had short bouts of improvement where he was getting better, then severe setbacks which took over in the end. He got the best results by far when eating nothing but vegetables, mostly raw, along with some supplements. He had not yet been told to take insulin shots.

His having high blood sugar for so long had wreaked havoc on everything. He even lost most of his teeth, which diabetics are prone to. He had serious edema and ascites—where the abdomen fills with “water” (protein fluid) and just keeps on getting bigger. He was likely headed for amputations due to tissue death in the extremities (starting with toes usually), was having vision problems (many diabetics go blind or partially so). Then there was the nerve pain, terrible shooting pains from nerve damage due to the disease. He had a chronic cough partly due to the ace inhibitor he was taking to “protect his kidneys” and often was out of breath. Couldn’t wear shoes other than too-big flip flops due to chronic edema (swelling). The list could go on (infections and such). I mean, wow, he really suffered in the final stages, full-time for two plus years.

See here for a basic explanation of diabetes: https://www.webmd.com/diabetes/tc/type-2-diabetes-topic-overview#1

When all hope is lost

Tom’s doctor had urged him to get to a cardiologist, but he’d refused. I don’t know how much good that would have done; it seems medical treatment is so often sadly disappointing, only leading to more and more and deeper and deeper, every “remedy” causing further problems. Some people are fortunate to have a reasonable quality of life after intensive medical treatments, like pacemakers to control the heart beat, which may have done Tom some good. But in his condition, he couldn’t even work up the desire to try, and he couldn’t be forced. It was so hard for him to get around at all; he hadn’t gone upstairs (or even one step up) at the house for many months.

Of course I and my brother would have helped him and taken him anywhere, been there for him, but he had given up hope. He could have had a procedure called “paracentesis” where they drain the ascitic fluid from the abdomen, and had even gotten his doctor’s approval; but then was warned by one who does the procedure that diabetics are not well advised to do it because of their high risk of infection (peritonitis). So he was discouraged from that, and just went on suffering with a hugely bloated abdomen. And without dealing with the underlying cause (the heart failure), paracentesis would have been only a temporary solution. So, what hope was there?

My poor dear brother “Tommy.” (I use quotes because he didn’t like “Tommy,” preferred Tom or Thomas, but I use “Tommy” affectionately, remembering him as an adorable toddler.)

A message from the other side

Tom’s gone from this world and I’m not sure where he is now. I’d asked him the next day (Monday) out loud, to send me a signal if he was now happy, in a good place, safe, protected, that loved ones can be together again in some all-new and beautiful existence. The following morning as I was awake lying in bed I heard a 3-beat “wooden wind chime” noise from the living room. It startled me because I have nothing set up anywhere to use that tone, and anyways, there was no alert tone set up anywhere in the house (I don’t even do that).

The noise obviously came from my cell phone, so I went through it and listened to all the message alerts and there it was, number 6 in the list, titled “message 3.” I believe the tone had sounded at 7:32am. All that is significant for the number 3, since Tom knew I had a superstitious “thing” about the number 3 as being good, my “lucky number,” all that. Now, I’d never used that tone in my cell phone (or anywhere else) for anything. And there was no reason for that sound (or any other) to have come from the phone. No reason at all…other than my brother’s spirit answering my question from the previous day with a “YES” in a way I would “get it.”

People can believe that or not, think I’m nutty (true enough), or whatever they want to think or say. But I know what happened. And I’m trusting that my brother’s spirit is indeed in a wonderful new existence free of all pain, suffering and death, only experiencing bliss and great adventures throughout the universe and maybe even beyond. Free to travel as the wind and be wherever he wants to be, with only loved ones for company whenever those spirits desire company.

Had I forced Tom to be vegan, and thereby caused his death?

Tom wasn’t vegan or even vegetarian, in case anyone reading is thinking, “Aha, veganism is deadly just like we say!” Or other such nonsense. Tom had a lifelong struggle with food addiction and obesity, and was into Atkins and “paleo” type dieting which he’d believed the hype about from a young age. I often tried to convince him to be vegan or at least mostly so. He tried once in awhile but could not give up the meat, eggs, dairy, along with all the rich treat foods like desserts and such. An eating addiction is a terrible thing. Chronic overeating, especially of animal fats is the cause of type 2 diabetes: https://www.riseofthevegan.com/blog/diabetes-reversal-with-plant-based-diet, aside from the obesity it causes. Tom’s addictive nature was something I wished he could’ve overcome. But he couldn’t. And he suffered badly for it. I truly believe he suffered far more than enough to atone for his wrongs in life.

In closing

I miss him so; even miss bickering with him, his sarcasm and sharp mind. He had a great compassionate side which was sparingly revealed. I love him always and only wish we could have done more together, communicated better, etc., etc. But we did our best, considering our family history (which I won’t go into).

If you have someone you love and they’re suffering with overeating and obesity, do beware of this disease, diabetes. I once had the overeating and obesity problem too. Big appetites, obesity and diabetes run in our family. Thankfully, veganism has pretty much solved that problem for me. The body can only take so much abuse from too much fatty or rich, taxing food over years and years. The pancreas can only do so much producing of insulin and secreting it into the bloodstream, regulating the body’s blood sugar level. Once the pancreas is shot…or the insulin it produces is stopped by fat from getting the sugar into the cells, so the sugar remains and builds up in the blood…it is a hell of a thing to deal with.

Food addiction took our little brother away from us at only 55 years of age. Try not to let anything like that happen to you.

Below are some images of Tom from when he was young, in loving tribute…

Tommy at 3 all dressed up

Tommy at 1 yr. and me in goofy Hawaiian dance show garb

Tommy at about 3 with Santa

Tom and best buddy Mark at about 4 yrs old

Tom (age 5), me and our aunt on Easter Sunday 1967

Tom at 12 after he’d lost a bunch of weight and feeling great

Sigh… 💧

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Vegans and the Great Vitamin A Scare – Oh Lordy!!

UPDATE 5/23/17: See below – “How do you know you have a problem with vitamin A?” and “Plant Foods Highest in Vitamin A showing 12:1 beta-carotene to retinol conversion.”

UPDATE 5/22/17: Regarding the conversion ratio for beta-carotene to retinol, I’d believed it was 6:1 (having gotten that figure from an anti-vegan meat enthusiast of all things, lol) and had used that ratio herein; but I’ve read elsewhere that scientists have raised the ratio to something like averaging 12:1, so I’ve revised the information below accordingly, just to be on the safe side.

Vitamin A is a fat-soluble* vital nutrient important for healthy vision, the immune system, and reproduction. *So it’s best to have a bit of healthy fat (like avocado, nuts, etc.) with your beta-carotene-rich foods to help with absorption/utilization. Vitamin A also helps the heart, lungs, kidneys, and other organs work properly.

Note: “Vitamin A” and “retinol” will be used interchangeably throughout, since they’re essentially the same. Also, this article is long and and a bit exhaustive, only because it’s good to be armed with thorough understanding when confronted by such tactics as those mentioned herein.

First, the scary story goes something like this:

“These ignorant, emotionally driven vegans believe they’re so healthy on their plant food diets and believe they don’t have to worry about vitamin A, but we robust meat lovers know better. You see, retinol is the only usable form of vitamin A and beta-carotene is a poor, weak substitute which must be converted by your body to retinol, at a ratio of twelve to one (maybe even more!). Retinol is only in animal products, while beta-carotene is in inferior plant foods. Animal liver is especially loaded with real vitamin A, and that’s why (among many other reasons) it’s imperative that we eat animal products.

Vegans are fooling themselves, see; veganism is fraught with dangers! And vitamin A deficiency is especially ominous since vitamin A is important for normal vision, the immune system, reproduction, and proper functioning of our vital organs.

So, get you some beef liver and ice-cream and chow down, after all it’s for your very survival! Forget those vegetables & fruits as good sources; you have to eat tons of that indigestible ‘food’ to get your needed retinol from converting it in your system, if you even CAN convert it! Many people cannot convert it at all, such as infants, so they absolutely must eat animals (or take vitamin A supplement)!”

So after hearing that, among all the other fear tactics, the unaware animal-respecting would-be vegan is effectively led away from veganism, angry over having been mislead by those malnourished, despicable vegans. They fall willingly into the embrace of the meat/egg/butter zealots, convinced that animal protein and fat are vital to human health. (But most any good cardiologist will tell you quite the opposite when being honest rather than opportunistic.) People become quite frightened though, convinced that eating liver and/or other animal products will save them from vision problems and all the rest. Animal ag mission accomplished.

But it gets even scarier!

“As far as infant nutrition, well, since babies cannot convert beta-carotene to retinol at all, well, babies simply must have animal sourced A, or at least a retinol supplement!”

Oh, really? Scary, yes, but it’s all based in “untruths” (to be polite).

Now, for the truth:

An adult human (male) needs something like 3,000 IU (international units) of vitamin A per day for good health, especially to protect eyesight. One large sweet potato has about 28,000 IU of vitamin A as beta-carotene. The body’s conversion ratio of beta-carotene to retinol is about 12:1. So, 28,000 divided by 12 is 2,333, almost enough usable A in just that one orange-fleshed sweet potato.

What if you’re one of the unfortunate who has impaired conversion of retinol to A? [See “Groups at Risk of Vitamin A Inadequacy” in reference 1 linked below.] The worst case scenario is with a genetic type of people (those carrying at least one T in two genes), so they have a 70% lower conversion of beta-carotene to retinol, so they only use about 30% of it. So, say one eats the equivalent of four sweet potatoes in a day. That’s 112,000 IU of beta-carotene, divided by 12 is 9,333 IU, and 30% of that is 2,800 IU. So you’re still fine. But that’s a lot of sweet potatoes (the richest vegetable source of A), so although it’s possible for this group of people to use food alone for A, they may well need vitamin A supplement to be vegan, or to drink carrot juice (which I love) often, since it is loaded with beta-carotene at 45,133 IU in just one 8-oz. glass.

How do you know you have a problem with vitamin A?

Symptoms include night blindness, dry skin, and frequent infections. People may experience these common symptoms: dry eyes, dry skin, frequent infections, inability to see in dim light, or spots in the eyeball.

Fortunately, many plant foods contain beta-carotene, such as spinach, carrots, pumpkin, cantaloupe, mangoes, apricots, cherries, red peppers, and so forth. So a variety of those foods in a day and you’re likely meeting or far exceeding your vitamin A needs. If you’re one who hates all those foods, then you’d be well advised to learn to like them or get your vitamin A elsewhere. But animal liver or cod liver oil are not necessary and it’s fairly easy to get far too much retinol from them which can lead to serious but uncommon conditions outlined in reference 2 linked at bottom. Vitamin A and beta-carotene supplements are of course available, but I don’t use them, far preferring food sources.

Here’s my minimal vitamin A intake for May 21st, for example:

1 medium carrot      10,000 IU      

4 cups raw spinach 11,250 IU

1 tomato                     1,000 IU

2 medium mangoes 6,000 IU

8 oz. V8 type juice       900 IU

Total                          29,150 IU ÷ 12 = 2,429 IU (women’s requirement is 2,300)

And this was a low vitamin A day for me, I sometimes get much more by adding a sweet potato; so you see it’s pretty easy. Nothing all that difficult or scary about vitamin A for vegans!

As an added reassurance: Extra vitamin A, due to its being fat soluble is stored in the (healthy) liver and taken up as needed by the body. So consuming adequate amounts of A everyday is not always necessary; you can pig out on sweet potatoes one day and have enough vitamin A stored in your liver to last several days. (Actually, the liver is said to store a 1–2 year supply of vitamin A!)

Note that vitamin A as retinol is slightly impaired by heat, while beta-carotene is not so impaired; in fact, cooking carrots for 15 minutes or less makes their vitamin A even more available by breaking down the walls of the plant cells that contain beta-carotene. But, raw or cooked are both fine as long as you eat plenty and chew thoroughly if raw (or blend as in smoothies).

“Lions tho”…

Only truly carnivorous animals like lions cannot convert beta-carotene to retinol at all, so they must get animal sources of retinol. That’s why these paleo activists and others are so hellbent on believing they need liver and such, since they believe humans are carnivorous omnivores. Well, quite simply, we’re not. We’re far more like self-made omnivores who do much better leaving off the animal products. And all omnivores can thrive with zero animal foods if nutritious plant foods are available. And guess what, most humans have them available, in abundance. (Thank GOODNESS for crop farmers.)

[See Table 2 in reference 1 linked at bottom for a list of several foods and their retinol content.]

“But, Babies Must Have Animal Source Vitamin A!”

…say all these paleo and low-carb, meat industry activists out there anyways.

This is the really “scary” bit, about “infants not being able to convert beta-carotene to retinol, at all!” Oh my, that sounds like a recipe for vision problems or even blindness, and all sorts of other disastrous problems for children throughout life, unless they eat liver and animal products, right? Now, who would force a dangerous vegan diet on their beloved child out of respect for animals? Well, we’re dealing with seriously misleading fear tactics there.

Here’s the not so scary truth:

When born at normal term and breastfed by healthy moms (or, less desirably, given proper formulas), infants’ vitamin A levels are what they should be and they develop just fine and with perfectly healthy eyesight. Infants have stores of retinol in their livers from their moms, as nature intends it, as well as through breastfeeding and getting the needed colostrum from mother’s first milk.

But if there is doubt, all baby formulas contain vitamin A supplement. Do note that vitamin A pills (as opposed to beta-carotene) can be derived from fish liver oil, but many commercial vitamins are synthetic, thereby cheaper and easier to produce than natural vitamins. Non-animal vitamin A supplement is synthesized from acetone, and there is said to be no chemical difference between the purified vitamins derived from plant or animal sources and those produced synthetically (http://www.madehow.com/Volume-3/Vitamin.html).

Vitamin A deficiency is quite rare in infants in developed countries like the USA, usually occurring in rare infants with malabsorption disorders [see reference 5 linked at bottom]. Those infants’ retinol levels can be increased and maintained with enough vitamin A supplement.

In premature babies, their stores of vitamin A are lacking due to not getting adequate amounts due their short time in the mother’s womb, and their retinol levels often remain low during the first year of life. They also need careful vitamin A supplementation.

But as long as the mother is nutritionally aware and eating plenty of beta-carotene rich foods according to her needs (such as if she has conversion problems), everything should be fine. To be on on the safe side, it would follow that pregnant/breastfeeding women should get about twice as much beta-carotene as she’d need normally, which is equivalent to about four sweet potatoes, but can of course be gotten from a variety of other foods as well.

Plant Foods Highest in Vitamin A showing 12:1 beta-carotene to retinol conversion:

a) Large (7”) Sweet Potato
1 whole: 28,000 IU = 2,333
after 12:1 conversion

b) Carrot
1 medium: 10,000 IU = 833 after conversion

c) Kale
1 cup chopped: 6,693 = 558 after

d) Spinach
2 cups raw: 5,626 IU = 469

e) Apricots
3 fruits: 2,022 IU = 168

f) Broccoli
2 cups raw: 1,134 IU = 95

Yielding 4,456 converted and totally legitimate IUs of real vitamin A, perfectly within the 2,300 (minimum) to 5,000 IUs recommended for adult women and just about twice a woman’s basic needs normally, so quite enough for a pregnant woman.

[See Table 1 in reference 1 linked below – note that “mcg RAE” roughly multiplied by 3 is your minimal IU need (after the 12:1 conversion of beta-carotene to retinol), so 900 mcg = 2,700 IU in this instance. NIH’s explanation is calculating before the conversion factor, so please don’t be confused there.]

And keep in mind that most pregnant/nursing women, whether vegan or not, take a variety of supplements or at least a multi-vitamin/mineral supplement for pregnant women, so are likely beyond fully nourished to grow a healthy baby.

Interestingly, even in “third world” or developing countries where women are often malnourished, infants have sufficient vitamin A while breastfeeding, but deficiency occurs just after they stop breastfeeding. So those children of course need much more beta-carotene rich food, or supplement. But be very careful with vitamin A supplement (as opposed to beta-carotene); too much “real” retinol can reach toxic levels and is linked to increased bone fractures in women*, among other problems…

[See references 2, 3 and *4 links at bottom for warnings about vitamin A toxicity, either from pills or from animal foods.]

Note that it’s virtually impossible to get too much beta-carotene from food, as the body only converts as much beta-carotene into retinol as it needs. So, while for adult supplements it’s safer to get beta-carotene rather than vitamin A as retinol, that’s not so good for certain groups such as smokers. Due to interactions with certain drugs and other factors, excessive beta-carotene supplementing has actually shown to increase risks for cancers in those groups (http://healthyeating.sfgate.com/much-beta-carotene-bad-you-11397.html). So again it’s best to get your A from foods rather than pills.

So, bottom line regarding the baby retinol scare: The equivalent of one large sweet potato and a big healthy dark green salad with carrot and a couple of mangoes (just for example) per day is all most women need to maintain healthy vitamin A levels throughout pregnancy and beyond and to provide plenty of retinol for their babies through six months old. If born prematurely, most everyone already knows babies can benefit from supplements, including safe amounts of vitamin A.

A normal baby’s need for vitamin A is about 1,200 IU daily, about half that of an adult woman, so after a baby is weaned, just two cooked carrots at 18,400 IU divided by 12 leaves him/her with with about 1,500 IU usable vitamin A. As the child grows of course, the nutritional needs rise [see Table 1 in reference 1 linked below – again, remember “mcg” multiplied by 3 is your IU number after the 12:1 conversion]. After 6 months of age, or after weaning, all babies can do fine with only plant sources of A. So vegan babies are quite well off as long as their parents are nutritionally aware, same as any other babies but even better, since they’re not brought up depending on animal abuse and slaughter.

In conclusion:

Aside from all that above, most pregnant/nursing women, as well as many other people, take multiple vitamin supplements including vitamin A (as retinol or beta-carotene). I don’t…only take very few supplements…as I feel much safer getting needed nutrition from plant foods. Plant foods are antioxidants and fiber rich (life preserving, cancer preventative, heart healthy), unlike animal foods, and this all further concurs with my being rightfully and passionately opposed to slaughterhouses and all the rest of such terrible human behavior.

So, what’s all this fear-mongering about “real” vitamin A from animal foods versus “blindness causing fakery” from plant foods (etc., etc.)? Well, it’s all in the interests of the animal agriculture industry and all of its offshoots, naturally. Don’t be fooled. Study the issues yourself using objective, legitimate sources, such as the following…

References:

1) All about vitamin A: https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminA-HealthProfessional/

2) Dangers of too much “real” retinol: http://www.mayoclinic.org/drugs-supplements/vitamin-a/safety/hrb-20060201

3) More real dangers of overdosing on retinol: http://www.nytimes.com/health/guides/disease/hypervitaminosis-a/overview.html

4) Increased bone fractures in women from too much retinol: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11754708

5) Malabsorption disorders in infants: http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/931041-overview#showall

6) Yes, carrots, etc., are recommended for babies: https://www.babycenter.com/0_vitamin-a-in-your-childs-diet_10324693.bc

Disclaimer

This article provides information that should not take the place of professional advice. I am not a nutrition or health professional but am sharing what I’ve learned through experience and from what I trust are good sources in regard to my own nutrition. If you have concerns, I encourage you to talk to a (vegan friendly) registered dietitian or other trusted professional about your dietary needs.

Non-Vegan or Anti-Vegan, That is the Crux

To vegans:

People often accuse us of being nasty or judgmental towards non-vegans, turning them off from even attempting to be vegan in their not wanting to be associated with such hateful, vicious people. After all, if that’s how being vegan makes one feel, all angry and venomous, then they want nothing to do with it, would rather remain happy eating bacon and burgers with all the normal well-adjusted people. That’s how the story goes anyways. But it’s a crock load of nonsense, like all other anti-vegan brainwashing.

I treat non-vegans with respect and politeness, same as they treat me; but I treat anti-vegans with disdain or no regard at all because that’s what they deserve, at the very least.

A distinction that should be obvious

As with legal and illegal immigration, there is a huge difference between non-vegans and anti-vegans. Still, a more middle-ground non-vegan may have anti-vegan views developed by learning from media and elsewhere that vegans are to be despised and pitied for our “stupidity and lack of nutrition,” but those are the more neutral and reachable sorts of non-vegans, as they don’t have a vested interest in some sort of animal product industry, or they’re not overly emotionally charged with regard to what they like to eat. They are willing to listen to the other side of the story.

The anti-vegans, however, who actually deserve much worse than the worst vegans have to offer, are those venomously anti-vegan, obsessed individuals who often seem to make it their life’s mission to destroy veganism and for “humanity” to remain existing in slaughterhouse-based “civilizations.” They already know the vegan side of the story and they cannot tolerate it. These rabid anti-vegans want no vegans in the world, they often tell us to kill ourselves and other such hateful heckling; they’re basically just frothing with hatred for all things vegan. Those are the people many vegans are “bashing” or otherwise being “aggressively judgmental” about. The difference between non- and anti- is clear, although muddied up and obscured expertly by the usual suspects.

Cartoon by Zach Weinersmith 2008

That’s not to say some vegans aren’t annoyingly priggish and pushy at times, but they’ve got their reasons, are rightfully upset or angry. Consider how no one would accuse anti-pedophilia activists of being priggish and pushy, except for pedos, that is. If you’ve a problem with comparing animal slaughter to child molestation or other violent crimes, then you need to examine your real reasons for that reaction…get fully honest with yourself. Everyone knows that those ruthless/violent towards animals are 99% the ones who will treat people likewise as soon as the opportunity arises. Please realize what you are nurturing by embracing such speciesism.

How to deal?

So, when critics of vegans are tone-policing us to make us feel bad and wrong for speaking up, for treating decent people like shit and being counterproductive, destroying our cause, realize what’s going on there. It’s all lies based in more lies with a foundation of subhuman cruelty. Think of your own lives and how you treat family and others based in their respect for you and treatment of you; remember how you are not this self-righteous scourge whom everyone dreads running into for fear of your attacking their plates of food and screaming at them, etc.. Or if people do dread you, it’s about something else, not your non-use of animal products. But it’s often about their own guilt and shame which they, not you, have brought to light simply due to you’re statement, “I’m vegan.”

Case in point: I have a neighbor who I only mentioned to once that I’m vegan as a hint, because she’s been giving me holiday gifts with animal products which I’ve had to donate elsewhere, and I didn’t want that anymore. No, I didn’t tell her I’ve donated her gifts or in any way mention them…I’ve only thanked her for them in the past. So recently, when I ran into her carrying a plate of food from the barbecue area, she actually tried to hide it from me. I could only say a friendly hello and be perplexed and keep on walking. We’re both very mature women and this seems like such childish behavior. But that’s what happens to people when this particular “nerve” gets struck in them, just from the simplest mention of someone being vegan.

Now, to the tone-policing vegan basher out there, the above incident would be further proof of vegans being self-righteous pricks and “no wonder everyone hates us” and all that nonsense, all based in the strange ”I’m guilty and you’re bad for making me feel this” reaction of the triggered meat lover, based in my doing nothing at all inappropriate or in any way impolite. I simply didn’t want to get any more non-vegan gift items. By the way, last Christmas, her idea of vegan was still milk chocolate and other animal products. So there you go…I attributed it to her husband buying the gifts and not knowing any better. Off to the homeless center the unwanted items went. Sigh.

So, if you as a vegan have been letting yourself feel put down and guilty for simply existing and not being silent about your ethical concerns and your grief for the animals, try to not let that happen anymore. Try to make clear out there the difference between non- and anti-vegans and whenever necessary, don’t let the latter get away with the usual deceitful tactics. Realize what’s going on and that you’re not to blame. You’re not destroying any cause by fighting fire with fire (as in “ammo” not blazes) at times and you’re not responsible for people “eating a hamburger right now” (and a 2nd one for extra spite!) or any of the other nonsense people will pull out of their nether regions. A lot of it is gaslighting, which I wrote about in an earlier article.

In closing, simply don’t ever let yourself feel like a wrongdoer for grieving and fighting to end the torturous lives and ruthless killing of these helpless, highly sensitive beings: